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Chuck Buntjer's Travels on Water Ways!

The following photos were taken on some of my trips when cruising the waters of the world! After the photos, I have documented some of the most famous rivers I have had the good fortune to be on plus other bodies of water such as seas and bays. Three rivers are the longest in the world and many others are the longest in their respective countries where they flow.


Gail & Chuck - Zambezi Zambia

Strait of Magellan - Chile

Chuck & Gail - Amstel River Netherlands

Chuck's Birthday - Hawaii

Chuck - Fiji

Another Birthday - Puerto Rico

Ha Long Bay - Vietnam

Volga Cruise - Russia

Rio de Janeiro - Amazon River

Lake Atitlan - Guatemala

Chao Phraya River - Thailand

Chagre River - Panama

Cabo San Lucas - Sea of Cortez

Iquazu Falls - Argentina

Rio San Juan River - Nicaragua

Bosporus - Turkey

Camuy River - Puerto Rico Caves

Seine - Paris

Niagara Falls - Canada

Thames River - England

Douro River - Portugal

Java Sea - Indonesia

Singapore Strait - Singapore

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Nile River - Egypt

The Nile is a major north-flowing river in northeastern Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. It is 6,853 km long or 4,258 miles long.

Amazon River - Brazil

The Amazon River in South America is the largest river by discharge of water in the world, averaging a discharge of about 209,000 cubic meters per second, greater than the next seven largest independent rivers combined, it is 4,000 miles long.

Yangtze River - China

The Yangtze River, known in China as the Chang Jiang or Yangzi, is the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world and the length is 3,915 miles long.

Chao Phraya River - Thailand

The Chao Phraya River begins at the confluence of the Ping and Nan river at Nakhon Sawan and flows from north to south for 372 kilometres or (231 mi) 231 miles from the central plains through Bangkok to the Gulf of Thailand.


Volga River - Russia

The Volga River is the longest river in Europe. It has its source in the Valdai Hills about 200 miles from St. Petersburg, and flows into the Caspian Sea. It is 2,294 miles long.

Mekong River - Vietnam

The Mekong is a trans-boundary river in Southeast Asia. It is the world's 12th-longest river and the 7th-longest in Asia. It drains an area of 795,000 km², discharging 457 km³ of water annually. It is 2,703 miles long.

Seine River - France

The Seine is a 776 km long river and an important commercial waterway within the Paris Basin in the north of France. Its length is 482 miles long.

Thames River - England

The River Thames flows through southern England. It is the longest river entirely in England and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. Its length is 215 miles long.


Zambezi River - Zambia

The Zambezi is the fourth-longest river in Africa, and the largest flowing into the Indian Ocean from Africa. The area of its basin is 1,390,000 square kilometres, slightly less than half that of the Nile. The 1,599 miles long river begins in Zambia and empties into the Indian Ocean. It's most noted feature is the Victoria Falls and other falls.

Río de la Plata River - Argentina

The Río de la Plata River is 180 miles long and widens from about 1.2 miles at the inner part to about 140 miles at its mouth. It forms part of the border between Argentina and Uruguay. The coasts of the Río de la Plata are the most densely populated areas of Argentina and Uruguay. The most notable feature is the Iguazu Falls.

Chagre River - Panama

The Chagres River is 120 miles long and located in central Panama and is the largest river in the Panama Canal's watershed. The river is dammed twice, and the resulting reservoirs—Gatun Lake and Lake Alajuela—form an integral part of the canal and its water system. The Pacific end of the canal is 24 cm higher than the Atlantic end and has much greater tides.

Mississippi River - U.S.A.

The Mississippi River is the chief river of the largest drainage system in North America. Flowing entirely in the United States (though its drainage basin reaches into Canada), it rises in northern Minnesota and meanders slowly southwards for 2.340 miles to the Mississippi River Delta at the Gulf of Mexico. The Mississippi ranks as the fourth longest and tenth largest river in the world.


Lake Nicaraqua

Lake Nicaragua or Cocibolca is a freshwater lake in Nicaragua. Of tectonic origin and with an area of 3,191 sq miles, it is the largest lake in Central America, the 19th largest lake in the world (by area) and the 9th largest in the Americas, slightly smaller than Lake Titicaca. With an elevation of 32.7 metres (107 ft) above sea level, the lake reaches a depth of 26 metres (85 ft). It is intermittently joined by the Tipitapa River to Lake Managua. Ometepe is an island formed by two volcanoes rising from the lake.

Grand Canal - Italy

The Grand Canal (Italian: Canal Grande, Venetian: Canalasso) is a canal in Venice, Italy. It forms one of the major water-traffic corridors in the city. Public transport is provided by water buses (Italian: vaporetti) and private water taxis, and many tourists explore the canal by gondola. At one end, the canal leads into the lagoon near the Santa Lucia railway station and the other end leads into Saint Mark Basin; in between, it makes a large reverse-S shape through the central districts (sestieri) of Venice. It is 2 miles long , 30–90 m wide, with an average depth of five meters (16.5 ft).

Bosporus - Turkey

The Bosphorus is a strait that forms part of the boundary between Europe and Asia. The Bosporus, the Sea of Marmara, and the Dardanelles strait to the southwest together form the Turkish Straits. The world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosporus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara (which is connected by the Dardanelles to the Aegean Sea, and thereby to the Mediterranean Sea).

Coastal Cruise - Alaska

Alaska is a U.S. state situated in the northwest extremity of the North American continent. Alaska has the longest general coastline of any state. The Alaskan coastline extends for 6,640 miles, a distance greater than that of all the other states' coastlines combined. Including islands, Alaska has 33,904 miles of shoreline. The estimated tidal shoreline, including islands, inlets sounds and bays, is 47,300 miles. Alaska is one of the most beautiful states with incredible landscapes and a variety of wildlife.


Strait of Magellan - Chile

The Straits of Magellan are approximately 370 miles long, and ranges from 3 to 35 kilometers (1.9 to 22 mi) at its narrowest and widest points, respectively. The Strait of Magellan (also called the Straits of Magellan) is a navigable sea route immediately south of mainland South America and north of Tierra del Fuego. The strait is the most important natural passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans but it is considered a difficult route to navigate because of the unpredictable winds and currents and the narrowness of the passage. An important natural passage between the oceans, it is considered a difficult route to navigate because of the inhospitable climate and the narrowness of the passage.

Amstel River - Netherlands

The Amstel is a river in the Netherlands which runs through the city of Amsterdam. The river's name is derived from Aeme stelle, old Dutch for "area abounding with water" and it is 19 miles long. The well-known Magere Brug bridge in Amsterdam crosses the river, as do the Blauwbrug, Hoge Sluis and Berlagebrug bridges. The Stopera city hall and opera house and Carré theatre are both located on the banks of the river. The rowing races Head of the River Amstel and Heineken Roeivierkamp are held on the river annually. The river also forms part of the route of the Canal Parade, Amsterdam's annual floating gay pride parade.

Tasman Sea - New Zealand

The Tasman Sea is a marginal sea of the South Pacific Ocean, situated between Australia and New Zealand. It measures approximately 1,200 across, and extends 1,440 miles from north to south. The sea was named after the Dutch explorer Abel Janszoon Tasman, who was the first recorded European to encounter New Zealand and Tasmania. The British explorer Captain James Cook later extensively navigated the Tasman Sea in the 1770s as part of his first voyage of exploration. The Tasman Sea is informally referred to in both Australian and New Zealand English as The Ditch; for example, crossing the ditch means travelling to Australia from New Zealand, or vice versa.

Waitomo River - New Zealand

The name "Waitomo" comes from the Maori words wai, water and tomo, hole or shaft. The Waitomo river in New Zealand meanders through the Waitomo Glow worm Caves attraction is a cave at Waitomo on the North Island of New Zealand, known for its population of glowworms, Arachnocampa luminosa. This species is found exclusively in New Zealand. They are around the size of an average mosquito. This cave is part of the Waitomo Caves system that includes the Ruakuri Cave and the Aranui Cave. The attraction has a modern visitor centre at the entrance, largely designed in wood. There are organized tours that include a boat ride under the glowworms. I have not been able to find the actual length of the river so it remains unknown as far as miles are concerned.


Lake Atitlan - Gautemala

Lake Atitla is a lake in the Guatemala highlands. It is technically endorheic (lacking direct flow to the sea) but substantial seepage feeds two nearby rivers. Atitlan is recognized to be the deepest lake in Central America with maximum depth about 1,120 feet. The lake is shaped by deep escarpments which surround it and by three volcanoes on its southern flank. Lake Atitlan is further characterized by towns and villages of the Maya people. German explorer Alexander von Humboldt is the earliest prominent foreigner generally quoted as calling it "the most beautiful lake in the world." The lake basin is volcanic in origin, filling an enormous caldera formed in an eruption 84,000 years ago. The Atitlán is surrounded by several immense active volcanoes. It really is too much of a good thing."

Rio San Juan River - Nicaragua

The San Juan (Spanish: Río San Juan), also known as El Desaguadero ("the drain") , is a 119.7 miles long and flows east out of Lake Nicaragua into the Caribbean Sea. A large section of the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica runs on the right (southern) bank of the river. It was part, with the lake, of a proposed route for a Nicaragua Canal in the 19th century. The idea of the project has been revived in the last decade, including the possibility of other routes within the country.[citation needed] The Ecocanal project has obtained a Concession from the National Assembly of Nicaragua to re-open the San Juan River to commercial barge traffic. The Cañas–Jerez Treaty states that Nicaragua owns the waters of the river and that Costa Rica can only use it for commercial navigation on certain parts of the river at Nicaragua's discretion.

Ngô Ðong River - Vietnam

Tam Coc-Bích Ðong is a popular tourist destination near the city of Ninh Bình in northern Vietnam. The Tam Coc (“three caves”) portion is a three-hour excursion by small boat along the Ngô Ðong River, beginning at the village of Van Lam and proceeding through a scenic landscape dominated by rice fields and karst towers. The route includes floating through three natural caves (Hang Ca, Hang Hai, and Hang Ba), the largest of which is 125m long with its ceiling about 2m high above the water. The boats are typically rowed by one or two local women who also sell embroidered goods.

Caribbean Sea - Bahamas

The Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean surround the islands of the Bahama. Officially the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, is an island country consisting of more than 700 islands, cays, and islets in the Atlantic Ocean; north of Cuba and Hispaniola (the Dominican Republic and Haiti); northwest of the Turks and Caicos Islands; southeast of the U.S. state of Florida and east of the Florida Keys. Its capital is Nassau on the island of New Providence. The designation of "Bahamas" can refer to either the country or the larger island chain that it shares with the Turks and Caicos Islands. As stated in the mandate/manifesto of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the Bahamas territory encompasses 189,000 miles of ocean space.


San Francisco Bay - California

San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary that drains water from approximately forty percent of California. Water from the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, and from the Sierra Nevada mountains passes through the Bay to the Pacific Ocean. Specifically, both rivers flow into Suisun Bay, which flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which connects at its south end to San Francisco Bay. However, the entire group of interconnected bays is often called the San Francisco Bay. The main part of the Bay measures 3 to 12 miles (5 to 20 km) wide east-to-west and somewhere between 48 miles (77 km)1 and 60 miles (97 km)2 north-to-south. It is the largest Pacific estuary in the Americas. San Francisco Bay is in the U.S. state of California, surrounded by a contiguous region known as the San Francisco Bay Area (often simply "the Bay Area"), dominated by the large cities San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose. The waterway entrance to San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean is called the Golden Gate. Across the strait spans the Golden Gate Bridge. The bay was designated a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance on February 2, 2013.

American River - California

The American River (Río de los Americanos during the Mexican-ruled period before 1846) is a California watercourse river system which runs from the crest of the Sierra Nevada mountain range to its confluence with the Sacramento River in Sacramento, California. The Sacramento River continues to eventually empty into the San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean at San Francisco, California. The American River flows entirely within California. It is 119 miles long. The American River is divided into the North, Middle, and South forks, which are located in El Dorado County, Placer County, and Sacramento County. The river's three forks originate in the Tahoe and Eldorado National Forests.

It is also is a great place to do a White Water Rafting adventure!

Camuy River - Puerto Rico

The Camuy River Cave Park (Spanish: Parque de las Cavernas del Río Camuy) is a cave system in Puerto Rico. It is located between the municipalities of Camuy, Hatillo and Lares in northwestern Puerto Rico, but the main entrance to the park is located in Quebrada, Camuy. The caverns are part of a large network of natural limestone caves and underground waterways carved out by the third-largest underground river in the world, the Río Camuy (Camuy River). The cave system was discovered in 1958 and was first documented in the 1973 book Discovery At The Río Camuy (ISBN 0-517-50594-0) by Russell and Jeanne Gurnee, but there is archaeological evidence that these caves were explored hundreds of years ago by the Taíno Indians, Puerto Rico's first inhabitants. Over 10 miles of caverns, 220 caves and 17 entrances to the Camuy cave system have been mapped so far. This, however, is only a fraction of the entire system which many experts believe still holds another 800 caves. Only a small part of the complex is open to the public. The 268-acre park built around the cave system features tours of some of the caves and sinkholes, and is one of the most popular natural attractions in Puerto Rico.

Niagara River - Canada

The Niagara River is a river that flows north from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario. It forms part of the border between the Province of Ontario in Canada (on the west) and New York State in the United States. There are differing theories as to the origin of the name of the river. According to Iroquoian scholar Bruce Trigger, "Niagara" is derived from the name given to a branch of the locally residing native Neutral Confederacy, who are described as being called the "Niagagarega" people on several late-17th-century French maps of the area. According to George R. Stewart, it comes from the name of an Iroquois town called "Ongniaahra", meaning "point of land cut in two". The river, which is occasionally described as a strait, is about 35 miles long and includes Niagara Falls in its course. The falls have moved approximately 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) upstream from the Niagara Escarpment in the last 12,000 years, resulting in a gorge below the falls. The International Control Works, built in 1954, regulates the river flow. Ships on the Great Lakes use the Welland Canal, part of the Saint Lawrence Seaway, on the Canadian side of the river, to bypass Niagara Falls. The total drop in elevation along the river is 99 metres (325 ft). The Niagara Gorge extends downstream from the Falls and includes the Niagara Whirlpool and another section of rapids.


Douro River - Portugal

The Douro River, Latin Durius, Spanish Río Duero, Portuguese Rio Douro, third longest river of the Iberian Peninsula, draining a catchment area of 30,539 square miles (79,096 square km). Rising in the Sierra de Urbión in Spain, the river crosses the Numantian Plateau in a pronounced bend and flows generally westward for 556 miles (895 km) across Spain and northern Portugal to the Atlantic Ocean at Foz do Douro. As far as Aranda de Duero, Spain, it is narrowly confined by its banks; it then widens across the broad plains of Old Castile. Beyond Zamora the river narrows again, and when it reaches the border with Portugal (which it follows for 70 miles [113 km]), it plunges about 1,250 feet (380 m) within 30 miles (50 km) in a series of gorges and rapids. In Portugal, between Peso da Régua and Porto (Oporto), the river has considerable barge traffic, taking the wine from the port-wine area to Vila Nova de Gaia; from Pedorido to Porto there is some coal traffic. The river mouth is silted, and the artificial port of Leixões (erected in 1892 and further developed in 1916) has grown up to the north of the estuary.

Singapore Strait - Singapore

Singapore Strait Johore Strait, Bahasa Malaysia Selat Tabrau, northern arm of the Singapore Strait, 30 mi (50 km) long and 3/4–3 mi wide, between the Republic of Singapore and the region of Johor at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula. It is crossed by a rail and road causeway linking Johor Baharu, Malaysia, with Woodlands, Singapore. The strait was the scene of fighting in February 1942 during the Japanese drive to conquer Singapore, then a British colony. Its eastern portion contains the Singapore islands of Ubin and Tekong Besar and has a deepwater access channel to Changi naval base on Singapore’s northeastern coast.

Java Sea - Indonesia

Java Sea, is an extension of Indian Ocean, lying between the Indonesian Islands of Borneo, Java to south, Sumatra to West and Sulawesi to the east. Due to its unique location, Java Sea happens to be the connecting link between these ports which are a treasure of cultural diversity. Even though not much is known about Java Sea in terms of tourism, it is in fact a large sea, made of shallow waters. The average depth of water in this sea is 151 feet that runs across its entire sprawl. It covers a large area of about 320,000 square kilometers on the Sunda shelf. Even though this sea is not a very famous cruising option, the islands located in it are exquisite and rich with cultural history, a great choice for an enriching vacation.

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  Charles Walter Buntjer




San Francisco California
Created on: 2014.08.24  




Updated on: 2017.03.06